Social issue on teen dating

The new study, conducted by Urban Institute researchers Janine Zweig and Meredith Dank, gives insight into the methods perpetrators use, who the victims are, and when the abuse is carried out.

“New technologies–social networking sites, texts, cell phones, and emails–have given abusers another way to control, degrade, and frighten their partners,” Zweig stated.

The trouble is that ‘Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Month’ is a mouthful, and can obscure the issue, making it seem complex and intimidating to teenagers.

It’s easy for teens to think of dating abuse as an issue that doesn’t apply to them, that they don’t understand, or that is boring.

In his Teen Dating Violence Awareness & Prevention Month Proclamation President Obama called on all Americans “to stand against dating violence when we see it.” At a time when an estimated 1 in 10 teens will experience dating violence we all must take this opportunity to amplify our efforts and shine a spotlight on this important issue. Nationwide, youth age 12 to 19 experience the highest rates of rape and sexual assault.

Studies show that approximately 10% of adolescents report being the victim of physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner during the previous year.

The theme for Teen DV Month 2016 is “Love = Setting Boundaries,” and specific resources around that theme are available on the loveisrespect website, including a Love Is Respect guide and information about February webinars and Twitter chats.

This adds up to 1.5 million high school students last year alone.

What Is Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month?

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month (TDVAM).

“Abusers use technology to stalk their partners, send them degrading messages, embarrass them publicly, and pressure them for sex or sexually explicit photos,” Dank added.

Among the study’s key findings: SAN FRANCISCO (April 27, 2016) – Futures Without Violence (FUTURES) announced today that it received its first Webby Award for That’s Not Cool, a website aimed at preventing teen dating violence and digital abuse.